Atlanta Immigration Office

Marcus Blanford

The Atlanta Immigration Office ensures that United States immigration laws are strictly adhered to. Its main purpose is to make sure that all immigrants are able to enter the country legally. Since January, federal immigration authorities have taken 121 family units and 336 young people into custody from the Atlanta […]

The Atlanta Immigration Office ensures that United States immigration laws are strictly adhered to. Its main purpose is to make sure that all immigrants are able to enter the country legally.

Since January, federal immigration authorities have taken 121 family units and 336 young people into custody from the Atlanta field office. These individuals came from Central America seeking asylum.

Immigrant Rights

Immigration Offices ensure that the United States’ immigration laws are strictly enacted and upheld. They also assist applicants with their immigration-related needs. Currently, there are two common methods of immigrating to the United States; employment-based and family-based. In both cases, you must retain an experienced immigration lawyer to help you through the process.

Immigrants have contributed to American business and society. Yet current law confines millions of them to lives in the shadows, without access to foundational social protections and limited economic opportunities. These conditions hurt families and communities, including U.S. citizens and noncitizen legal residents.

A vibrant movement has developed to protect the rights of immigrants. Students work with organizers, faith leaders and elected officials to raise awareness of the harm caused by anti-immigrant policies and enforcement tactics. They also support community efforts to create spaces that promote safety, support networks, and a sense of belonging for everyone. They are fighting for a national policy that keeps families together, eliminates deportation threats, and enables people to stay in the communities where they built their lives.

Asylum

Each year, thousands of people seeking protection from persecution arrive at our borders or travel to the United States through the asylum process. Asylum is available to those who have suffered past persecution or fear future persecution on the basis of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, political opinion, or economic situation. Those granted asylum are known as “asylees.” Asylum seekers are not allowed to work while their asylum case is pending, but they can bring family members and apply for lawful permanent residence and citizenship.

Asylum is a discretionary form of relief established by the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and incorporated into U.S. law by the Refugee Act of 1980. Congress has broadened the definition of refugee and added additional safeguards for people seeking asylum. The IRC supports these standards and a robust asylum system. Asylum restrictions hurt people from Central America the most, says Alicia Vasquez-Crede of Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service. Many are fleeing general, not targeted, gang violence, and immigration judges don’t think that’s enough to qualify as refugee grounds.

Refugee Resettlement

Resettlement is the voluntary transfer of people whose lives have been uprooted by conflict or natural disaster to another country for permanent residence. This process may offer a pathway to citizenship in their new home country, but it is not a shortcut to asylum.

There are currently about twenty-seven million refugees around the world who are in need of protection and a safe place to live. Refugee resettlement is only one tool that UNHCR, the United Nations’ refugee agency, uses to help them.

Once a refugee arrives in the United States, they must start rebuilding their lives. They need housing, money to buy food, and employment, among other things. The government helps them get started by providing them with a small amount of cash and by coordinating with private agencies that work with the State Department to provide them with short-term language, employment, and social services. The Ghafoori family fled Afghanistan to Huntsville, Alabama, last year with their six children.

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